Tag Archives: DIY project

Upcycled Cabinet Door Artwork Tutorial

Earlier this week I posted a before and after post of my kitchen-cabinets-turned-artwork project.

Truth be told, this project has been a long time coming. I painted these a while ago. We finally hung them up this weekend! Isn’t that how most things happen?

Upcycled Cabinet Door Artwork Tutorial:

I used wood filler in all the holes left from the hinges and knobs. After it dried, I sanded that down and then painted the doors with a foam roller. You can read more about that here.

Fast foward – we didn’t need to use the cabinet doors anymore. I posted them on CraigsList, but due to the assortment of random sizes they weren’t useable to anyone. Before tossing them all, I saved a few thinking they might be useful.

I started by spray painting the cabinet doors. This color is Italian Olive by Krylon.

I printed out my numbers in my font of choice (I used “MyWorld” from DaFont.com). For reference, each number is about 9″ tall.

Since I don’t have a large scale printer, I printed sections of it out on different sheets of paper and then taped them together. I taped that to the door and starting to firmly outline the shape with a ballpoint pen.

You’ll want to press hard enough with the pen to leave an indentation of the outline of the shape on the board. Don’t be afraid to scribble. It doesn’t have to be precise, you just need the general shape.

Use a small craft paint brush to fill in your outline. I did two coats, letting it dry in between coats. If your shapes aren’t perfect you can always sand that part down a bit more in the future steps.

Then I used some leftover stain we had in the basement and covered the whole door with stain.

After the stain dried I began sanding and scraping the doors, focusing especially on the letters.

There is no special way to do this. I used an assortment of sandpapers – ranging from very rough to fine. I also slammed a screwdriver on it a few times to give the board a few nicks.

Then I stained the board a second time to darken the places I had sanded. I let the boards dry for a couple of days before I touched them again.

To hang them, I added some picture hanging hardware. I needed to be sure to use screws that were short enough that they wouldn’t come out the other side!

My previous claim to the project being “F-R-E-E” wasn’t totally true. I forgot about this part. I bought hanging hardware at Target for $2.99. You will get about 20 pieces and wire, and I only used 4. So I suppose I could claim this project only cost about 35 cents.

We are very happy with the end result! And extra excited to finally have the artwork above our couch not seem like we just moved in. This definitely helped bring our living room one step closer to feeling completed.

What kind of artwork or decoration do you have in your living areas? Have you DIYed any of it?

I’m linking up to Nifty Thrifty Tuesday No.113 at Coastal Charm and Beneath my Heart’s Best DIY of May Projects

DIY Ruffled Camera Strap

I am a documenter.

I save movie tickets. I have saved nearly every greeting card I have received in my lifetime. I scrapbook. Everything. From important things like weddings and births, to random life, like going to see Harry Potter with an eyeliner lightening bolts drawn on my face with a friend. (Don’t act surprised.)

I’m the “the picture-taker”. As soon as I had enough babysitting money I would ker-plunk down my $7.99 for one of those wind-up 35mm film camera and click away with my friends. I love the anticipation of how my photos would turn out when I picked them up from the store. The day I got a digital camera and I was no longer limited by those precious 24 shots… life was good.

Yep. I’m that friend. The one who makes you pose in front of funny road signs or with the parking lot attendant. My husband has learned to grin and bear it. Literally.

That being said, when I saw lots of people with tricked out camera straps, I knew I needed to make one!

When I am using my SLR camera for an extended period of time, I like to keep the strap around my neck as a safety precaution. Many of these swanky camera strap covers have extra padding in them for extra comfort. Sign. Me. Up.

This is NOT a tutorial. My goal is to become a better sewer this year, and I’m learning! I melded some basic principles from this tutorial at Tidy Mom and this one at Midwestern Sewing Girl for my finished product.

I didn’t have any interfacing on hand and I was too lazy to go to the store, so I used felt. And I like it. I think it adds even more cushion than interfacing would have.

This was my first ruffle! I don’t care to say how long it took me to attach it to the strap, but I did it. And that’s all that matters. :  )

I used a gray seeksucker fabric for the front and remnants of my dining room curtains for the backside.

Since seersucker is an inherently thinner fabric I doubled it over, so there are two layers.

This is why I can’t write tutorials yet. I’m usually a do-it-as-I-go kinda gal.

It can make for really messy instructions. : )

Now I can keep on snappin’ to my heart’s delight!

Check out more a step-by-step process at Tidy Mom or Midwestern Sewing Girl (for the ruffle).

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On another note:

I recently saw this video and wanted to share. I wish I had seen this when I was 16. Love your skin! Say no to tanning beds and hello to sunscreen!

How to Make $0.24 Christmas Cards


via

One of my favorite things this time of year is receiving mail. Good old fashioned, stamped, icky tasting envelope sealant snail mail.

No one sends mail anymore these days. It’s all about the modern technologies called email and text message. My mailbox (not to be confused with my inbox) is usually full of credit card offers, landscaping company fliers and coupons for dry cleaning.

But not lately! The last few weeks we have opened up cards with sparkles and photos and flourish.

I’ve finally recovered from sending out wedding-related mail and we sent out a few cards this year. While there are tons of adorable online options (like Tiny Prints and Shutterfly), I wasn’t really feeling the price tag at $1.15 to $1.50 per card. Captain Cheap-o over here, remember?

We had a friend take our picture (free!) and I put together my card in Adobe Illustrator. Then I uploaded my file and ordered prints of my card from Shutterfly. Remember to leave extra room just in case of sloppy cropping so the words or photo didn’t get sliced off. I also choose the matte finish to prevent fingerprints and look more card-like.

I ordered 50 prints of our card from Shutterfly for .09 cents each and I had an email promo code for free shipping = $4.50

Then I went to Joann Fabric’s and purchased a pack of blank cardstock folded cards that came with the accompanying envelope.

A package of 50 blank cards for $9.99 (Mine were on sale for $7.50, or you could print out a 20% off Joann’s coupon) = $7.50

Then I used some rubber cement to adhere my “photo” to the front and all I had to do was write on the inside and ship them off.

If I has purchased my 50 cards from one of the internet resources I was looking at I would have spent: 50 x $1.30 = $65 (+ shipping) total

Since I only spent $4.50 for the prints and $7.50 for the cards I spent a grand total of $12.00, bringing my cost to $0.24 cents a card.

I saved $53.00 by making my cards rather than purchasing them online!!

Now if I could figure out a way to mail them for less than $0.42 cents each…

and I leave you with my favorite Christmas song:

Coffee Can Thanksgiving Centerpiece


As many good projects begin these days, I was perusing Pinterest and came across a photo of a twig vase. Lightbulbs flashed before my eyes and this project was born.

I saved a coffee can and went outside for some free twigs that are scattered all over our yard.

I tried to find twigs that were relatively straight and thin.

(While searching for twigs, you may come across a stick that strongly resembles Voldemort’s Elder Wand. You consider keeping it, but then think better of it and put it back down.)

Step 1.

Use gardening shears to cut the twigs all the same length. I used the height of the coffee can plus a centimeter or two. I also broke off any nodules or mini-twigs.

Step 2.

Like any good crafter, I went hot glue gun crazy.

First I removed the coffee can label and then I just started gluing on twigs as flat as possible. Some fit next to certain twigs better than others. It does NOT have to be perfect. Imperfection is charming.

Step 3.

After the glue was dry, I wrapped some twine and ribbon around the can a few times and tied a bow.

(I had purchased a fall-ribbon pack from the Target Dollar Spot earlier in the season.)

Step 4.

Fill ‘er up!

I opted to use some of my trusty rhododendron branches since I knew they lasted forever. I put a drinking glass in the can and filled it with water since I didn’t trust the coffee can not to leak or rust. Then I rubber banded my branches together and stuck them in the glass.

There are endless options – you could fill it with a potted plant, a chunky candle or even candy!

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And that’s all! One hour and one dollar (ribbon) later, here we are.

Also, I can change out the ribbons and can stretch this project to last through Christmastime.

Hot glue guns are the best thing ever!

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A few year’s ago I started attending my now-husband’s family reunions, where they served the most delicious coffee! After several of these reunions I had to ask them what type of beans they used. They just laughed at me and said they buy Chock-Full-O-Nuts Original. I have been buying it ever since.

What kind of coffee do you drink?